Calice Becker

France France
No less than four of her creations are unbeaten masterpieces. Looking at the passionate perfumer's lifestory and family from whom she received a love of and reverence for fragrance... Read more
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Interesting Facts
No less than four of her creations are unbeaten masterpieces. Looking at the passionate perfumer's lifestory and family from whom she received a love of and reverence for fragrance and art, things could have turned out differently for her.

Born and raised in Paris, she was expected to pursue a career in the medical field. Thanks to the numerous influential women in her family, Calice Becker prioritized her ultimate passion - creating unrivaled fragrances.

She completed her training at the Givaudan Academy in Grasse. She began her career at Roure Bertrand Dupont as a trainee in 1984, then moved to Quest International as a perfumer in 1994. From there, Givaudan poached the exceptional talent. As vice president, she took over the Givaudan branch in New York and became director of Givaudan's renowned perfumery school in Grasse and president of SIPC (Société International des Parfumeurs). She has already proved her perfumery skills for today's most notable designers.

Among her greatest successes are "J'Adore" by Dior, "Tommy Girl" by Tommy Hilfiger and "Secret Obsession" by Calvin Klein. She created "Velvet Orchid" for Tom Ford and her bespoke signature scent for style icon Ines de la Fressange. Like many other perfumers, Calice Becker also ventured into niche products.

The collaboration with the successful label By Kilian was particularly fruitful and helped her achieve some of her greatest successes. Creations such as the iconic unisex perfume "Back to Black" or "Intoxicated" ennobled the French woman with Russian roots overnight and paved her way into the international fragrance elite.

Her fragrances are destined to become bestsellers due to their outstandingly unique features. When asked about her favorite ingredients, Calice Becker answered: "everything from bitter orange".

The New Yorker-by-choice draws her inspiration from nature but also art or music. She sees a bright future for perfume creation, especially during the age of advanced technology.

The actual creation process will remain up to the creative mind behind it. Because, according to Calice Becker: Creation is not a democratic process.
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